Incoming Faculty, Spring 2018 (Ph.D. Arizona State University, 2005) – human-environment interactions; vulnerability; hazards and disasters; environmental justice; health disparities; climate change, water, wildfire, and air pollution

tim collins

Contact

  • Office: TBD
  • e-mail: TBD
  • phone: TBD

Research Interests:

  • Social vulnerability to hazards, risks, and disasters
  • Environmental injustices in terms of social inequalities in exposure to environmental hazards and access to environmental amenities
  • Social and spatial disparities in health outcomes related to environmental exposures
  • Human dimensions of climate change, flooding, wildfire, air pollution, and other environmental phenomena

 

Interests/Description:

Tim Collins is an incoming faculty person in the Department of Geography at the University of Utah. He is a human geographer whose research is interdisciplinary, collaborative, and focused on environmental justice, health disparities, and social vulnerability to hazards/disasters. His research has relied on applying multiple methods (e.g., spatial analysis, statistics, survey research, as well as qualitative) to examine human dimensions of flooding, wildfire, air pollution, climate change, and other environmental phenomena. He has led research and student training projects funded by the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, and Environmental Protection Agency, and he has served as Chair of the Hazards, Risks, and Disasters Specialty Group of the American Association of Geographers. He is currently interested in working with students and faculty on research projects that develop novel insights about environmental health disparities.

Education:

  • 2005 Ph.D. (Geography). Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.
  • 2000 M.A. (Geography). Chico State University, Chico, CA.
  • 1998 B.A. (Geography). Chico State University, Chico, CA.

Courses Taught:

GEOG 5963/6960 – Environmental Justice Research

Publications:

Since 2013; student co-authors are underlined; those conducting the research as undergraduates are denoted with *

  • Collins, T., and S. Grineski. 2018. Environmental justice and flood hazards: a conceptual framework applied to emerging findings and future research needs. Chapter 28 in R. Holifield, J. Chakraborty, and G. Walker (eds.), Handbook of Environmental Justice. New York: Routledge. ISBN-13: 9781138932821.
  • Grineski, S., and T. Collins. 2018. Environmental justice and borders: lessons from the U.S.-Mexico borderlands. Chapter 42 in R. Holifield, J. Chakraborty, and G. Walker (eds.), Handbook of Environmental Justice. New York: Routledge. ISBN-13: 9781138932821.
  • Collins, T., S. Grineski, and D. Morales. In press (accepted 8/31/17). Environmental injustice and sexual minority health disparities: a national study of inequitable health risks from air pollution among same-sex partners. Social Science & Medicine. DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2017.08.040.
  • Jimenez, A., and T. Collins. In press (accepted 8/21/17). “How do we not go back to the factory?” Contradictions of urban development for a Latina-led NGO. City.
  • Collins, T., S. Aley, T. Boland, G. Corral, M. Cox, L. Echegoyen, S. Grineski, O. Morera, and H. Nazeran. In press (accepted 2/6/17). BUILDing SCHOLARS: enhancing diversity among biomedical researchers from the U.S. Southwest. BMC Proceedings.
  • Sianez, M., L. Highfield, H. Balcazar, T. Collins, and S. Grineski. In press (accepted 7/12/17; publication available online). An examination of the association of multiple acculturation measures with asthma status among elementary school students in El Paso, Texas. Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health. DOI: 10.1007/s10903-017-0627-z.
  • Collins, T., S. Grineski, and J. Chakraborty. In press (accepted 2/3/17; publication available online). Environmental injustice and flood risk: A conceptual model and case comparison of metropolitan Miami and Houston, USA. Regional Environmental Change. DOI: 10.1007/s10113-017-1121-9.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, J. Chakraborty, and M. Montgomery. In press (accepted 8/22/16; publication available online). Hazard characteristics and patterns of environmental injustice: household-level determinants of environmental risk in Miami, Florida. Risk Analysis. DOI: 10.1111/risa.12706.
  • *Rocha, J., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2017. A qualitative examination of factors shaping high and low exposures to hazardous air pollutants among Hispanic households in Miami. Local Environment 22(10):1252-1267.
  • Morales, D., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2017. Increasing research productivity in undergraduate research experiences: exploring predictors of collaborative faculty-student publications. CBE-Life Sciences 16(2):ar42.
  • Morales, D., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2017. Faculty motivation to mentor students through undergraduate research programs: a study of enabling and constraining factors. Research in Higher Education 58(5):520-544.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, and D. Morales. 2017. Asian Americans and disproportionate exposure to carcinogenic hazardous air pollutants: a national study. Social Science & Medicine 185:71-80.
  • Collins, T., S. Grineski, J. Shenberger-Trujillo, D. Morales, O. Morera, and L. Echegoyen. 2017. Undergraduate research participation is associated with improved student outcomes at a Hispanic-serving institution. Journal of College Student Development 58(4):583-600.
  • Chakraborty, J., T. Collins, S. Grineski, and A. Maldonado. 2017. Racial differences in perceptions of air pollution health risk: does environmental exposure matter? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14(2):116.
  • Chakraborty, J., T. Collins, and S. Grineski. 2017. Cancer risks from exposure to vehicular air pollution: a household level analysis of intra-ethnic heterogeneity in Miami, Florida. Urban Geography 38(1):112-136.
  • Collins, T., S. Grineski, and D. Morales. 2017. Sexual orientation, gender, and environmental injustice: unequal carcinogenic air pollution risks in Greater Houston. Annals of the American Association of Geographers 107(1):72-92.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, and Y. Kim. 2016. Contributions of individual acculturation and neighborhood ethnic density to variations in Hispanic children’s respiratory health in a U.S.-Mexican border metropolis. Journal of Public Health 38(3):441-449.
  • Clark-Reyna, S., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2016. Health status and residential exposure to air toxics: What are the effects on children’s academic achievement? Family & Community Health 39(3):160-168.
  • *Daniels, H., S. Grineski, T. Collins, D. Morales, O. Morera, and L. Echegoyen. 2016. Factors influencing student gains from undergraduate research experiences at a Hispanic serving institution. CBE-Life Sciences 15(3):ar30.
  • Morales, D., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2016. Influences on faculty willingness to mentor undergraduate students from another university as part of an inter-institutional research training program. CBE-Life Sciences 15(3):ar35.
  • Clark-Reyna, S., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2016. Ambient concentrations of metabolic disrupting chemicals and children’s academic achievement in El Paso, Texas. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13(9):874.
  • Maldonado, A., T. Collins, S. Grineski, and J. Chakraborty. 2016. Exposure to flood hazards in Miami and Houston: Are Hispanic immigrants at greater risk than other social groups? International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13(8):775.
  • Grineski, S., S. Clark-Reyna, and T. Collins. 2016. School-based exposure to hazardous air pollutants and grade point average: a cross-sectional study. Environmental Research 147:164-171.
  • Clark-Reyna, S., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2016. Residential exposure to air toxics is linked to lower grade point averages among school children in El Paso, Texas, USA. Population & Environment 37(3):319-340.
  • *Maldonado, A., T. Collins, and S. Grineski. 2016. Hispanic immigrants’ vulnerabilities to flood and hurricane hazards in two US metro areas. Geographical Review 106(1):109-135.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, and L. Romo Aguilar. 2015. Environmental injustice along the US-Mexico border: residential proximity to industrial parks in Tijuana, Mexico. Environmental Research Letters 10:095012.
  • Collins, T., S. Grineski, and J. Chakraborty. 2015. Household-level disparities in cancer risks from vehicular air pollution in Miami. Environmental Research Letters 10:095008.
  • Collins, T., S. Grineski, J. Chakraborty, M. Montgomery, and M. Hernandez. 2015. Downscaling environmental justice analysis: determinants of household-level hazardous air pollutant exposure in Greater Houston. Annals of the Association of American Geographers 105(4):685-703.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, and H. Olvera. 2015. Local variability in the impacts of residential particulate matter and pest exposure on children'swheezing severity: a geographically weighted regression analysis of environmental health justice. Population and Environment. 37(1):22-43.
  • McDonald, Y., S. Grineski, T. Collins, and Y. Kim.  2015.  A scalable climate health justice assessment model.  Social Science &Medicine 133:242-252 (NIHMS ID: NIHMS 639564).
  • Chavez-Payan, P., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2015. Early life and environmental risk factors modify the effect of acculturation on Hispanic children’s asthma. Hispanic Health Care International 13(3):119-130.
  • *Balcazar, A., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2015. The Hispanic health paradox across generations: the relationship of child generational status and citizenship with health outcomes. Public Health 129(6):691-697.
  • Montgomery, M., J. Chakraborty, S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2015. An environmental justice assessment of public beach access in Miami, Florida. Applied Geography 62:147-156.
  • Collins, T., Hernandez, M., and S. Grineski. 2015. Immigration, mobility, and environmental injustice: a comparative study of Hispanic people’s residential decision-making and exposure to hazardous air pollutants in Greater Houston, Texas. Geoforum 60:83-94. [Collins and Hernandez have equal authorship].
  • *Balcazar, A., S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2015. The durability of immigration-related barriers to healthcare access for Hispanics across generations. Hispanic Journal of Behavioral Sciences 37(1):118-135.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, J. Chakraborty and M. Montgomery. 2015. Hazardous air pollutants & flooding: a comparative interurban study of environmental injustice. GeoJournal 80(1):145-158.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, Y. McDonald, R. Aldouri, F. Aboargob, A. Eldeb, L. Romo Aguilar, and G. Velázquez-Angulo.2015. Double exposure and the climate gap: changing demographics and extreme heat in Ciudad Juárez, Mexico. Local Environment 20(2):180-201.
  • Chakraborty, J., T. Collins, S. Grineski, M. Montgomery, and M. Hernandez. 2014. Comparing disproportionate exposure to acute and chronic pollution risks: a case study in Houston, Texas. Risk Analysis 34(11):2005-2020.
  • Chakraborty, J., T. Collins, M. Montgomery, and S. Grineski. 2014. Social and spatial inequities in exposure to flood risk in Miami, Florida. Natural Hazards Review 15(3): 04014006.
  • Collins, T., Y. Kim, S. Grineski, and S. Clark-Reyna. 2014. Can economic deprivation protect health? Paradoxical multilevel effects of poverty on Hispanic children’s wheezing. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 11(8):7856-7873.
  • Reyes, J., M. Fernandez, S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2014. Spatial analysis of disaster risk in Santo Domingo de Heredia, Costa Rica, Central America. Journal of Geography and Geology 6(3):123-132.
  • Emerick, N., T. Curry, T. Collins, and S. Rodriguez. 2014. Homicide and social disorganization on the border: implications for Latino and immigrant populations. Social Science Quarterly 95(2):360-379.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, P. Chavez-Payan, A. Jimenez, Y. Kim, *M. Gaines, and *S. Clark-Reyna. 2014. Social disparities in children’s respiratory health in El Paso, Texas. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 11:2941-2957.
  • Kim, Y., T. Collins, and S. Grineski. 2014. Neighborhood context and the Hispanic health paradox: differential effects of immigrant density on children’s wheezing by poverty, nativity and medical history. Health & Place 27:1-8.
  • Reyes, J., M. Fernandez, S. Grineski, and T. Collins. 2014. Natural hazards in Santo Domingo de Heredia, Costa Rica, Central America. Natural Science 6(3):121-129.
  • *Jimenez, A., T. Collins, and S. Grineski. 2013. Intra-ethnic disparities in respiratory health outcomes among Hispanic residents impacted by a flood. Journal of Asthma 50(5):463-471.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, and J. Chakraborty. 2013. Hispanic heterogeneity and environmental injustice: intra-ethnic patterns of exposure to cancer risks from vehicular air pollution in Miami. Population & Environment 35(1):26-44.
  • Collins, T., *A. Jimenez, and S. Grineski. 2013. Hispanic health disparities after a flood disaster: results of a population-based survey of individuals experiencing home site damage in El Paso (Texas, USA). Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health 15(2):415-426.
  • Collins, T., S. Grineski, P. Ford, R. Aldouri, L. Romo, G. Velázquez-Angulo, R. Fitzgerald, and D. Lu. 2013. Mapping vulnerability to climate change-related hazards: children at-risk in a U.S.-Mexico border metropolis. Population & Environment 34(3):313-337.
  • Grineski, S., T. Collins, J. Chakraborty, and Y. McDonald. 2013. Environmental health injustice: exposure to air toxics and children’s respiratory hospital admissions. The Professional Geographer 65(1):31-46.